fusing conventional cultural handicrafts & trendy know-how

 

‘Much less, Mild, Native’ by we+ explores the potential of uncommercial seaweed by respiratory new life into discarded and inedible Ita Nori sheets. Making use of ARAKAWA GRIP know-how alongside native supplies whereas drawing inspiration from traditional Japanese craft methods, the venture brings out seaweed’s inherent qualities of lightness and sustainability. The result’s a sequence of fascinating installations and luminous sculptures that provide recent views on the utilization of the meals, which might in any other case go to waste, as a design materials. All of the whereas, the venture pays homage to Ita Nori’s deep-rooted cultural heritage and handicrafts that it derives from. 


all photos courtesy of we+

 

 

we+ poses a pure design materials

 

Tokyo-based studio we+ conceived ‘Much less, Mild, Native’ as a design resolution to Japan’s rising amount of inedible seaweed by the hands of local weather change. Because the world’s largest client of seaweed, Japan is dealing with a regarding dilemma as rising temperatures and modifications in ocean currents and ecosystems have led to quite a few seaweeds rising wilted and missing in vitamins. Many species have been left unsuitable for human consumption, resulting in their combustion and wastage.

 

we+ specifically sought to revitalize Ita Nori, an in any other case edible seaweed sheet used for sushi and rice balls with a deep connection to conventional Japanese craftsmanship. The venture focuses on capturing the sheet-like and delicate but sturdy properties, fusing the standard handcrafted paper-making approach with the ARAKAWA Grip know-how which creates luminous areas by combining completely different supplies. The product demonstrates the knowledge of our ancestors, who conserved restricted assets with out waste and appreciated the gustatory qualities of this product,’ notes the staff.

we+ revives contaminated seaweed as luminous installation using japanese handicrafts

we+ revives contaminated seaweed as luminous installation using japanese handicrafts

we+ revives contaminated seaweed as luminous installation using japanese handicrafts

we+ revives contaminated seaweed as luminous installation using japanese handicrafts

we+ revives contaminated seaweed as luminous installation using japanese handicrafts

less light local wes new research project explores uncommercial seaweeds future through arakawa grip technology 10

‘Less, Light, Local’

‘Less, Light, Local’

‘Less, Light, Local’

 

 

venture information:

 

identify: Much less, Mild, Native
designer: we+

 

 

designboom has acquired this venture from our DIY submissions function, the place we welcome our readers to submit their very own work for publication. see extra venture submissions from our readers here.

 

edited by: ravail khan | designboom

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